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Bullying Can Traumatize Your Child

Bullying can traumatize your child. Children and teens still have developing brains and are supposed to go to school to learn and socialize. However, bullying can disrupt that. But what are the teachers and school staff doing about it?

Did you know that failing to respond to bullying or maybe making it worse can be a violation of your child’s civil rights? 

Of course, the first thing on your mind should be the well-being of your child, but if your child winds up having medical bills or needing expensive therapy because of the bullying they experience at school, there are legal options you can pursue. 

Dealing with Bullying Traumatizing Your Child

It’s important to know that bullying is not always a harmless thing that goes away on its own. 

We’ve all seen stories in the news about children committing suicide or hurting themselves over bullies at school.

The most important thing to do is to make sure your child’s mental health is cared for and that they are physically safe. 

If you are worried about their mental health, talk to their doctor about getting a referral for counseling services, or see if any are offered through your school or community programs.

What are my Legal Options?

As organizations that accept federal money, schools are required to comply with all federal civil rights laws. 

Federal civil rights laws apply to groups of people called a protected class, and this guarantees all people equal rights regardless of their membership in one of these classes. 

Protected classes are groups based on

  • Race
  • Gender
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation 
  • Religion
  • Ethnicity
  • Disability
  • National Origin
  • And More

If your child is being bullied because of their membership in a protected class, and your school does nothing to prevent or address the bullying, that is considered discrimination on part of the school. 

Depending on your case, you may be able to pursue legal action against the school and be entitled to compensation.

To learn more about federal bullying laws, click here. 

Other Signs of Discrimination

Sadly, where there is one sign of discrimination, there might be many. 

Be on the lookout for other signs of discrimination. 

These can include

  • Singling Students out
  • Excessive office or behavior referrals 
  • Grades not matching effort
  • Not following IEP (if applicable)
  • And more

We know there is a lot to remember with signs of discrimination. That is why we at Cueto Law made a free checklist that anyone can download! 

Click here to get your copy!

Additionally, you’re going to want to start saving any communication you have with the school, taking notes during meetings or phone calls, as well as keeping logs of bullying incidents and what the school does in response.

Should I get a lawyer?

Each case is different, and we always recommend talking to a lawyer.

That is why we at Cueto Law offer free consultations with our attorneys to discuss the specifics of your case and inform you of next steps.

Call 618-277-1554 to talk to one of our attorneys for free!

Different Ethnicities in Schools

Schools are diverse places. In this modern day, there are many different ethnicities in schools, but sadly this is not always a positive thing. Particularly when people are facing discrimination because of their ethnicity. What does discrimination in schools look like? What can parents do to help their children?

Sometimes our children face discrimination in schools, which breaks their parents’ hearts. 

It’s hard to see children dealing with the realities of the harsh world. 

So what can parents do? Do they have legal options? 

Discrimination and Different Ethnicities in Schools

Discrimination can happen, even in diverse environments. So no matter how many different ethnicities are in your child’s school, be sure to be on the lookout for common signs of discrimination.

These can include:

  • Grades not matching the effort put into work
  • Harsh discipline or frequent office referrals
  • Being singled out in school
  • Indifference to bullying
  • Not providing translations

For more information and a more detailed list, make sure to download our signs of discrimination checklist.

What does the Law say?

As organizations that accept federal money, schools must comply with all civil rights laws. Failing to respond to bullying is an indicator they are not doing so. 

This is a sign your school is violating your child’s civil rights. 

Schools must respond to bullying. Especially if the bullying is based on a child belonging to a protected class. Protected classes include:

  • Race
  • Gender
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation 
  • Religion
  • Ethnicity
  • Disability
  • National Origin
  • And More

If your child is being treated differently because of their ethnicity, then the school’s actions can be considered discrimination.

For more information on federal civil rights laws and bullying, click here.

Get a Free Consult

Each case is different. That is why we offer free consultations to potential clients. You can make an appointment to speak to one of our attorneys at no cost to you! 

We want to help you help your child, so please call us at 618-277-1554 to set up an appointment.

Bullied because of Ethnicity

It’s never pleasant to hear that your child is being bullied because of their ethnicity. While it’s normal to feel a range of emotions, it’s essential to know that you aren’t powerless and that you, as a parent, have options.

If your child is being bullied because of their ethnicity, the first thing you probably did was contact their teacher or school. What do you do, though, if the school does nothing?

Discrimination and Ethnicity

As organizations that accept federal money, schools must comply with all civil rights laws. Failing to respond to bullying is an indicator they are not doing so. 

This is a sign your school is violating your child’s civil rights. 

Schools must respond to bullying. Especially if the bullying is based on a child belonging to a protected class. Protected classes include:

  • Race
  • Gender
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation 
  • Religion
  • Ethnicity
  • Disability
  • National Origin
  • And More

If your child is being bullied for their ethnicity, and the school does nothing, then it is not complying with federal rights laws.

Their actions can be considered discrimination against your child.

For more information on federal civil rights laws and bullying, click here.

So what can I do?

If you think the school is discriminating against your child or creating a hostile learning environment, it’s important to talk to a lawyer about your options. 

Every case is different, and talking to a lawyer can be a good way to get advice specific to your case. 

A lawyer will want documentation to understand your case better.

We recommend beginning to keep a record of what happens at school. Save all written communication you have with the school, including emails and letters, keep your child’s school work, and document bullying incidents they report. 

Also, don’t forget to take notes during meetings.

And while you’re looking for a lawyer, remember that we at Cueto Law offer free consultations. You can call us at 618-277-1554 to talk to one of our attorneys for free. 

Discrimination Based on Ethnicity in Schools

We do not discuss discrimination based on ethnicity in schools as much as other kinds of discrimination. However, that doesn’t mean it isn’t a problem that should be addressed. No family should have to deal with discrimination in schools, but if you are, keep reading to learn about available resources and options.

What is Ethnic Discrimination?

In the United States, you have a right to be treated like anyone else. Being harassed, bullied, or singled out based on your ethnicity is a violation of federal civil rights law.

Sadly many experiences of discrimination are considered normal in our culture and something people just have to tolerate. This should not be the case, as it’s against the law.

While discrimination is mostly talked about in regards to the workplace, it can still happen in school.

Common signs of discrimination in schools include

  • Staff failing to address bullying
  • Frequent referrals to the principal for minor infractions
  • Grades not reflecting work or progress
  • Being Singled Out
  • Creating a hostile learning environment

Be aware of the signs of discrimination, and make sure to download a free signs of discrimination checklist to keep track of what you see happening.

Click here to download.

What exactly does the law say?

Your child’s school might be violating their civil rights.

As organizations that accept federal money, schools are legally required to comply with all federal rights laws. 

That means they have to take steps to prevent and address bullying when the bullying is based on any of the following categories.

  • Race
  • Gender
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation 
  • Religion
  • Ethnicity
  • Disability
  • National Origin
  • And More

If your child is being bullied for their ethnicity, and the school does nothing, then it is not complying with federal rights laws.

Their actions can be considered discrimination against your child.

For more information on federal civil rights laws and bullying, click here.

What are my legal options?

Generally, it’s a good idea to begin documenting the things you see to build a case. Keep all communication the school sends you and take notes during all meetings. 

However, every case of discrimination based on ethnicity in schools will differ and depend on the circumstances.

We at Cueto Law offer free consultations and can give you a better idea of your legal options. Call us at 618-277-1554 to speak to one of our attorneys. 

Talking to LGBTQ Teens about Bullying

Talking to LGBTQ teens about bullying is not something a parent wants to do, but sadly it is something that is still necessary. We as a nation are still dealing with discrimination, and sometimes, our children have to suffer the consequences of that. However, there are legal options families can take while still ensuring their child’s wellbeing.

If your child is being bullied in school, you should be aware that the staff and administrators have a legal responsibility to respond to that bullying in a quick and meaningful manner.

Click here to learn more!

Talking to LGBTQ Teens about Bullying

As a parent, you want your child to have an easy time at school and make tons of friends. However, sometimes the world is against them and learning that as a teen is never easy.

Make sure your child knows you are there for them and that you love them no matter what. 

Also, encourage them to remember the following things.

  • The bullying says more about the bullies than themselves.
  • Never apologize for being themselves.
  • Nothing the bullies say is true.

Additionally, remind them that responding to the bullies or acting as though they care or are hurt will only give the bullies what they want.

Bullies are looking for attention or reactions from their victims. Giving it to them teaches them your child is a source for those reactions, and the bullying will continue. 

By not giving it to them, the bully will learn to look elsewhere.

Mental Health Support

In addition to offering your support, it’s also important to ensure that your child has professional support if needed.

Children being bullied are at a higher risk for suicide and other mental health crises. Please reach out for help if you need it.

Click here for more information.

What are my legal options?

In addition to giving you tips for talking to LGBTQ teens about bullying, we want you to know your child’s school might be violating their civil rights.

As organizations that accept federal money, schools are legally required to comply with all federal rights laws. 

That means they have to take steps to prevent and address bullying when the bullying is based on any of the following categories.

  • Race
  • Gender
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation 
  • Religion
  • Ethnicity
  • Disability
  • National Origin
  • And More

If your child is being bullied for being LGBTQ, and the school does nothing, then the school is not complying with federal rights laws.

Their actions can be considered discrimination against your child for their sexual orientation.

For more information on federal civil rights laws and bullying, click here.

Be sure to be on the lookout for other signs of discrimination. Click here to download our free signs of discrimination checklist!

In the meantime

While building your case or looking for a lawyer, keep a log of all communication you have with the school. This can include emails, letters they send home, or notes taken during phone calls or meetings.

Additionally, keep invoices and receipts for all expenses related to the bullying, such as replacing damaged property or medical fees from any therapists or doctors you have to consult.

Reaching out to a lawyer

We at Cueto Law understand how difficult this is. That is why we offer free consultations to anyone who thinks they are facing discrimination.

Feel free to call us at 618-277-1554 to talk to one of our attorneys about the specifics of your case. 

LGBTQ Students and a Hostile Learning Environment

Have you ever walked in the halls of a school and wondered why there are so many safe space signs? Sadly we live in a world where LGBTQ children often face a hostile learning environment. We hope to explain here what a hostile learning environment is and when parents should be concerned.

What is a Hostile Learning Environment?

A hostile learning environment is not a phrase often heard. It’s more common to hear the phrase hostile work environment. However, the two can have some similarities. 

Both have

  • A situation of discrimination occurring and creating a harmful setting
  • Intimidating environment creating fear
  • A culture that denies, limits, or interferes with someone’s ability to gain benefits from a job, program, or school

For more details on a hostile learning environment, check out this blog post.

A hostile learning environment is a toxic place that makes it impossible for students to learn and denies them access to education. 

It’s often an indication of discrimination.

LGBTQ Students and a Hostile Learning Environment

If a child is being exposed to a hostile learning environment because they belong to a protected class, that is discrimination.

An example of this would be if a child is being bullied by students or teachers because of their sexual orientation and the school takes no steps to resolve the situation, that would be considered a violation of a student’s civil rights.

As organizations that accept federal money, schools are legally required to comply with all federal civil rights laws.

That means they cannot discriminate against someone because they belong to a protected class. Protected classes include

  • Race
  • Gender
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation 
  • Religion
  • Ethnicity
  • Disability
  • National Origin
  • And More

For more information on federal civil rights laws and bullying, click here.

How do I know if it’s Discrimination?

Spotting discrimination can be hard in this day and age. Social norms have forced it to become subtler than what might be depicted on television or in the media.

That is why we at Cueto Law compiled a list of signs of discrimination that is available to anyone for free.

Click here to download your copy!

We also offer free consultations to discuss the specifics of your case. Call us at 618-277-1554 to speak to one of our attorneys!

LGBTQ Teens and Discrimination

The last thing any parent wants to realize is that their LGBTQ teen is facing discrimination. Sadly many students are bullied or ostracized for their sexual orientation. But did you know that your child’s school is legally required to protect civil rights?

LGBTQ teens facing discrimination are bound to feel a wide range of emotions. If you are a parent of a student being bullied, you should be aware this can damage their mental health. There are several suicide prevention projects with many resources for queer teens and their families.

Click here for more information.

While there might be no federal bullying laws, schools are still legally required to take action against bullying and discrimination. If the school fails to do so, it can open them up to a lawsuit.

Laws Protect LGBTQ Teens against Discrimination

As organizations that accept federal money, schools are required to comply with all federal civil rights laws. 

Federal civil rights laws apply to groups of people called a protected class, and this guarantees all people equal rights regardless of their membership in one of these classes. 

Protected classes are groups based on

  • Race
  • Gender
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation 
  • Religion
  • Ethnicity
  • Disability
  • National Origin
  • And More

If your child is being bullied for being LGBTQ, and the school does nothing, then the school is not complying with federal rights laws.

Their actions can be considered discrimination against your child for their sexual orientation.

For more information on federal civil rights laws and bullying, click here.

Be sure to be on the lookout for other signs of discrimination. Click here to download our free signs of discrimination checklist!

What Can I do?

If you think your student’s civil rights are being violated, you might have the grounds to file a lawsuit. Start by keeping records of all communication with the school, save all receipts and invoices for expenses related to the bullying (counseling and so on), and call a lawyer to discuss your case.

At Cueto Law, our services are free to you unless we win. We don’t get paid unless you get paid, so make sure to call us at 618-277-1554 to talk to one of our lawyers. 

LGBTQ Students and Discrimination

Sadly we live in an imperfect world where LGBTQ students face discrimination in school. It is common to hear stories about these students facing bullying, indifference from school staff, along with insensitive questions. However, parents and students need to know that they are not the ones who need to change. Civil Rights laws require schools to take action against discrimination.

LGBTQ students facing discrimination feel a wide range of emotions. Bullying often affects mental health. There are several suicide prevention projects with many resources for queer teens and their families.

Click here for more information.

However, it is not your or your teenager’s responsibility to accept what is happening at school.

While there might be no federal bullying laws, your child is still protected. Schools are still legally required to take action against bullying and discrimination. If the school fails to do so, it can open them up to a lawsuit.

Sexual Orientation is a Protected Class

As organizations that accept federal money, schools are required to comply with all federal civil rights laws. 

Federal civil rights laws apply to groups of people called a protected class, and this guarantees all people equal rights regardless of their membership to one of these classes. 

Protected classes are groups based on

  • Race
  • Gender
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation 
  • Religion
  • Ethnicity
  • Disability
  • National Origin
  • And More

If your child is being bullied for being LGBTQ, and the school does nothing, then the school is not complying with federal rights laws.

Inaction is discrimination against your child for their sexual orientation.

For more information on federal civil rights laws and bullying, click here.

What Can I do?

If a school is discriminating against your child, you might have the grounds to file a lawsuit. Start by keeping records of all communication with the school, save all receipts and invoices for expenses related to the bullying (counseling and so on), and call a lawyer to discuss your case.

At Cueto Law, our services are free to you unless we win. We don’t get paid unless you get paid. Call us at 618-277-1554 to talk to one of our lawyers. 

Being Bullied for Being Gay?

Is your child being bullied for being gay? That can be a big problem for middle and high school students and something that creates a hostile learning environment for children. Being bullied for sexual orientation is never okay. It’s particularly problematic if the school administration does not take meaningful steps to combat bullying.

People often hear stories about teens on the LGBTQ+ spectrum who are being bullied. There was a lot of coverage a few years ago about the It Gets Better Project to prevent suicide from bullying. 

For more information, click here.

While activities have created awareness about bullying, the problem is far from over, and many families still deal with children being bullied for being gay.

But did you know that could be a violation of your child’s civil rights?

Being in a Protected Class

Schools accept federal money, which means they must comply with all civil rights laws. 

Federal civil rights laws apply to groups of people called a protected class, and this guarantees all people equal rights regardless of their membership to one of these classes. 

Protected classes are groups based on

  • Race
  • Gender
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation 
  • Religion
  • Ethnicity
  • Disability
  • National Origin
  • And More

If the school does nothing, then the school is not complying with federal rights laws.

Their actions can be considered discrimination against your child for their sexual orientation.

For more information on federal civil rights laws and bullying, click here.

Legal Options

Each case is different however, we at Cueto Law have experience working with families who need financial compensation for damages from discriminatory practices from schools. 

We recommend that families worried about discrimination in schools download our free signs of discrimination checklist! 

Click here for a freebie!

Additionally, keep records of all communication with the school, and save receipts for any therapy or expenses related to your child’s bullying. Feel free to call us at 618-277-1554 for a free consultation to discuss the specifics of your case! 

Federal Bullying Laws

Did you know there are no federal bullying laws? It’s surprising to many people and makes some parents feel angry. If their child is being bullied, does that mean the school doesn’t have to do anything about it? Not necessarily. It’s more complicated than that. 

Many parents assume their child is protected against bullying by federal law.

Surely there must be something in place to protect children and require schools to get involved in stopping bullying.

Many schools do. Most middle and high schools have codes of conduct that address both typical bullying and cyberbullying. Many states also require teachers to go through training on antibullying responses to get their certifications.

However, there is no federal law that explicitly addresses bullying.

So my child is not protected?

While it might seem like the federal government has left it up to schools, given that they have made no federal bullying laws, there are still federal laws that protect children.

As organizations that accept federal money, schools must comply with all federal civil rights laws.

These laws have stipulations about how protected classes must be treated. Protected classes include groups based on

  • Race
  • Gender
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation 
  • Religion
  • Ethnicity
  • Disability
  • National Origin

If the bullying is based on your child’s identity in one of these categories, and the school fails to take action, that could be considered discrimination on the school’s part. 

For more information on federal civil rights laws and bullying, click here.

What does the school have to do?

Schools are required to create an appropriate environment for all of their students. If they fail to respond to bullying in their school, this can create a hostile learning environment.

Children in a hostile learning environment do not gain skills or learn new information at the same rate as their peers. 

A hostile learning environment can deny a child equal opportunities for education.

If a school created this environment, it can be considered discrimination and a violation of the student’s civil rights.

Not responding to bullying based on a child belonging to a protected class can be a sign of discrimination. 

To learn more about signs of discrimination, download our free signs of discrimination in schools checklist.

Click here for your freebie!

What are my legal options?

If you think your child’s school has created a hostile learning environment, you might have legal options worth pursuing. However, each case is different. 

We would be happy to discuss the specifics of your case with you. Call us at 618-277-1554 to set up a free consultation with one of our attorneys. 

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